Reflections on the impact of agricultural certification on well-being

03 October 2017
Author: Daniel Phillips

Carlos Oya and colleagues recently published a systematic review of agricultural certification schemes that stands out for me as useful research for informing policy and programming. Why do I say that? Agricultural certification schemes set and monitor compliance to voluntary standards with the objective of making production socially sustainable and terms of trade fairer for smallholder farmers and workers.

Not missing the woods for the trees: mapping evidence gaps on land use and forestry programmes

21 March 2017
Author: Birte Snilstveit, Jennifer Stevenson

Forest protection is among the most effective approaches we have to mitigate climate change. At the same time, agricultural land and forests provide food, livelihoods and fuel for billions of people globally, particularly in low and middle-income countries (L&MICs).

How synthesised evidence can help with meeting the Sustainable Development Goals

11 April 2016
Author: Edoardo Masset, Emmanuel Jimenez

In early 2016, 193 governments across the world put together a to-do list that would intimidate even the most workaholic overachiever: wipe out poverty, fight inequality and tackle climate change over the next 15 years. The United Nations led in articulating these into 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)which were then translated into 169 target indicators that will be monitored – a remarkable feat given the disparate views of the various stakeholders.

Toward evidence-informed policies for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

04 August 2015
Author: Howard White

So, 2015 has arrived and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are to be replaced by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). But shouldn’t we stop and ask how we have done on the MDGs first? “How we have done” can be seen an outcome monitoring question: have the targets been reached? But since we have fallen far short on some targets, such as access to improved sanitation, we need to dig deeper and ask which policies have been successful in helping achieve the targets.

Not all ‘systematic’ reviews are created equal

10 March 2015
Author: Birte Snilstveit, Daniel Phillips, Martina Vojtkova

In a recent World Bank blog based on a paper, David Evans and Anna Popova argue that systematic reviews may not be reliable as an approach to synthesis of empirical literature.

Evidence gap maps: an innovative tool for seeing what we know and don’t know

05 February 2015
Author: Birte Snilstveit, Marie Gaarder

Whether you are a research funder, decision maker or researcher, keeping up with the ever expanding evidence base is not easy. Over 2600 impact evaluations and 300 systematic reviews assessing the effects of international development interventions have been completed or are ongoing to help answer that question and understand how, why and at what cost.  Despite this increase in quality evidence, more evidence is needed, which is why funders and researchers continue to fund and produce new research.

Myths about microcredit and meta-analysis

10 December 2014
Author: Hugh Waddington

It is widely claimed that microcredit lifts people out of poverty and empowers women. But evidence to support such claims is often anecdotal.

How 3ie is tackling the challenges of producing high-quality policy-relevant systematic reviews in international development

26 September 2014
Author: Hugh Waddington

At its annual colloquium being held in Hyderabad, India, the Cochrane Collaboration is focusing on evidence on the global burden of disease of mostly treatable illnesses that are concentrated among populations living in low- and middle-income countries (L&MICs).  We already have a lot of systematic review evidence about what works to prevent and treat them.  Yet they remain prevalent due to the lack of resources, implementation capacity and population attitudes.

Early engagement improves REDD+ and early warning system design and proposals

08 September 2014
Author: Heather Lanthorn, Jyotsna Puri, Stuti Tripathi, Beryl Leach

At 3ie, our mission is to fund the generation and sharing of sound, useful evidence on the impacts of development programmes and policies work. Actually, we’re more curious (or nosy) than that. For impact evaluation that matters, we need to know which bits of a programme worked, which didn’t, why and through which mechanisms, in which contexts and for what costs.

Gearing up for Making Impact Evaluation Matter

31 August 2014
Author: Heather Lanthorn

Over the last week, 3ie staff in Delhi, London and Washington were busy coordinating conference logistics, finalising the conference programme, figuring out how to balance 3ie publications and clothing in their suitcases, and putting the last touches to their presentations. This is usual conference preparation for a conference that is going to be different. Why is this conference different? The participant mix – more than 500 people – is balanced among policymakers, programme managers and implementers, and researchers.