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Seizing the Istanbul moment: rooting for evidence at the World Humanitarian Summit

In 2014, global humanitarian assistance totalled US$24.5 billion. The World Humanitarian Assistance Report (2015) noted that there was still a shortfall of 38 per cent in terms of unmet need. The UN Secretary General’s new report for the World Humanitarian Summit, finds that this gap has increased to 47 per cent. Put another way, humanitarian assistance needs to double to meet current needs.

Let’s bring back theory to theory of change

Anyone who has ever applied for a grant from 3ie knows that we care about theory of change. Many others in development care about theory of change as well. Craig Valters of the Overseas Development Institute explains that development professionals are using the term theory of change in three ways: for discourse, as a tool, and as an approach.

How synthesised evidence can help with meeting the Sustainable Development Goals

In early 2016, 193 governments across the world put together a to-do list that would intimidate even the most workaholic overachiever: wipe out poverty, fight inequality and tackle climate change over the next 15 years. The United Nations led in articulating these into 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which were then translated into 169 target indicators that will be monitored – a remarkable feat given the disparate views of the various stakeholders.

The pitfalls of going from pilot to scale, or why ecological validity matters

The hip word in development research these days is scale. For many, the goal of experimenting has become to quickly learn what works and then scale up those things that do. It is so popular to talk about scaling up these days that some have started using upscale as a verb, which might seem a bit awkward to those who live in upscale neighbourhoods or own upscale boutiques.

Impact Evaluation: How the Wonkiest Subject in the World Got Traction

Creating 3ie was the outcome of the Evaluation Gap Working Groupthat we led along with Nancy Birdsall to address the limited number of rigorous impact evaluation of public policies in developing countries. As CGD celebrates its 15th year, it is worth considering what made that working group so successful, the obstacles we confronted, and the work that still remains to be done.

Private outcomes and the public interest: a call for more impact evaluations?

The 2015 Year of Evaluation has now come and gone. There were many noteworthy events (more than 80 conferences, workshops, seminars and the like, according to some accounts), most of which focused on the needs in developing countries. Participants included some of the best known from the evaluation community across the public or non-government sectors. However, the interesting question raised in these events was, Where was the private sector?

Miles before we sleep: building evidence on forest conservation

The conference of parties (COP21) meeting in Paris last week arrived at a historic and new global consensus to stop climate change by committing to 1.5 Celsius increase in average temperature target. Promoting greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks or areas that absorb GHGs are an important way to mitigate climate change (see more in the IPCC report). Forests, along with oceans are the most important sinks in the world.

Seven impact evaluations on demand creation for VMMC: how a focused thematic window can meet multiple evidence needs

On World AIDS Day 2015, we are marking the culmination of 3ie’s third thematic window, which funded seven pilot programmes and rapid impact evaluations looking for ways to increase the demand for voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). In late 2013, we awarded grants to project teams of implementers and researchers to pilot innovative programs for increasing VMMC demand and to conduct rapid impact evaluations of those programmes.

Reflections on replication research: a conversation with Paul Winters

Replication research is often the space of junior researchers. As a well-cited research economist, with multiple international organisation affiliations, Paul Winters stands out in this space. I recently caught up with Paul to discuss his co-authored replication study of Galiani’s and Schargrodsky’s influential paper Property rights for the poor: Effects of land titling.

About

Evidence Matters is 3ie’s blog. It primarily features contributions from staff and board members. Guest blogs are by invitation.

3ie publishes blogs in the form received from the authors. Any errors or omissions are the sole responsibility of the authors. Views expressed are their own and do not represent the opinions of 3ie, its board of commissioners or supporters.

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