Promoting and mapping rigorous evaluations in humanitarian settings

In 2022, 274 million people will be in need of humanitarian assistance. During an emergency, it can be difficult to ensure that commonly-implemented interventions are appropriate and effective and even more challenging to assess by how much. Despite this, rigorous evidence on the effects of humanitarian interventions is growing and can help guide policymakers and practitioners. As part of the Humanitarian Assistance Evidence Cycle (HAEC) Award, 3ie is working on mapping the evidence on food security interventions in humanitarian settings and will conduct a curriculum development program to upskill practitioners to conduct impact evaluations in humanitarian settings.

Promoting and mapping rigorous evaluations in humanitarian settings

Food security exists when all people have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food at all times (FAO, 1996). During a humanitarian emergency, an individual’s ability to purchase food is adversely affected due to loss of income (Maxwell et al., 2008), while food production and transportation can also be severely disrupted (Bora et al., 2010).

Given the different avenues which cause food insecurity during an emergency, responses to this issue have been multi-sectoral. Agricultural interventions look to ensure food production continues, while market-based interventions aim to ensure individuals are still able to engage in their livelihood.

With this in mind, 3ie is mapping the existing evidence on food security interventions in humanitarian settings. A multi-sectoral intervention framework will allow the EGM to capture all interventions which aim to improve food security during emergencies.

3ie is also leading capacity building activities to support the production and use of impact evaluations in humanitarian settings. 3ie is developing online impact evaluation training materials for researchers, policymakers, and implementing partners.