Ashiqun Nabi

Ashiqun Nabi
Designation: Research Assistant
Ashiqun Nabi is a consultant research associate at 3ie. Ashiqun is a PhD student at UCL researching politics of demand for evidence in public health policy making. He has over seven years' experience of policy research with several prominent think-tanks. He has an MSc in Public Policy from UCL.

Blogs by author

What works to reverse democratic backsliding? It’s complicated

Many countries have faced democratic backsliding or autocratization, especially in the past 30 years. With a staggering 72 percent of the world population living in autocracies (according to the V-Dem 2023 report), we need more evidence to better understand what works to support democracy and freedom in backsliding contexts to reverse this trend. To support this effort towards evidence-informed decision-making in democracy programming, 3ie has gathered existing findings in an evidence gap map and rapid evidence assessment (REA), with support from the UK government's Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO).

Mapping evidence and gaps in interventions reducing anaemia in low- and middle-income countries

In 2019, 269 million children under five, 32 million pregnant women, and over half a billion women of reproductive age were reported to be affected by anaemia. The condition causes adverse health outcomes, delayed cognitive and physical development in children, and reduced productivity which may lead to economic losses

Strengthening democracy and freedom in backsliding contexts: mapping and synthesizing the evidence

In recent years, international observers such as the V-Dem Institute have highlighted an alarming crisis of democracy with a decline in competitive elections, political participation and public accountability. For the first time in two decades, the Institute’s 2023 Democracy Report found more closed autocracies than liberal democracies in the world.

Mapping evidence gaps in interventions improving food security in humanitarian settings

Natural and human-induced catastrophic events are pushing humanity to the brink. The compounding and cascading effects of armed conflicts, irreversible climate change, and the global outbreak of COVID-19 are devastating economies and driving more households into poverty. Today, nearly 193 million people are living in a food crisis (2022 Global Report on Food Crises) while 49 million are experiencing alarming levels of hunger (Hunger Hotspots report June 2022).