Evidence Impact: South Africa finds an effective way to teach children to read better

In 2019, as South African President Cyril Ramaphosa delivered his State of the Nation address, one of his new policy announcements was the expansion of a program aimed at helping children learn to read.

A systematic approach to building the evidence base for gender equality and women’s empowerment in fragile contexts

In 2020, 23 per cent of the world’s population lived in fragile contexts, including 76.5 per cent of all those living in extreme poverty. While women comprise about half of the population in fragile and conflict-affected contexts (FCAS), there are often major gaps in how interventions in these settings consider their inclusion and empowerment.

Evidence impact: The ways evaluation findings shape real world outcomes

The changes that research findings set in motion are often hidden from plain view. Evidence may inform the knowledge base for policies and programmes before decision makers make any concrete plans or contribute to small changes that they can push through.

The impact of aquaculture on productivity, income, nutrition and women’s empowerment: A call for evidence

Although aquaculture production has seen increased growth in recent decades, the evidence around the impact of aquaculture programmes on the welfare and health of participants in the aquaculture value chain remains scarce. If you know of any studies, published or unpublished, that evaluate aquaculture interventions with a gender lens, do share these papers and supplement our search.

Expert panel: 3ie's new food system Evidence Gap Map offers a roadmap of the field

Expert policymakers and researchers joined 3ie for a panel discussion on the new gap map, highlighting the ways it can be useful and the findings that surprised them.

This new evidence gap map shows what we know – and what we don't know – about food systems interventions

Right now, 690 million people are undernourished and at least 650 million people are obese. Given these staggering statistics, it is imperative that we use the best available evidence to improve nutrition and food security across the globe.

Despite the hype, do not expect big data to replace traditional surveys anytime soon

The COVID-19 pandemic has created new hype around the potential for new, ‘big’, data sources to revolutionize data collection, and change the landscape of evidence for policy. Non-traditional data sources - like satellite imagery, call detail records, and social media posts—do offer exciting opportunities to track and understand processes on Earth across space and time like never possible before.

Big Data in the time of a pandemic

With a significant number of active cases globally, the novel coronavirus represents an extreme public health challenge. The outbreak of the pandemic has led to stringent travel restrictions, making data collection a highly challenging task for the development research community.